The 10 Most Adventurous Digital Nomad Couples

One of the questions we hear most frequently is, “is it possible to be a digital nomad couple?” We say that not only is it possible but you can succeed admirably. All of these couples have been exploring the world together and working together for a long time. Check them out…

Amber & Eric “The Husband” Hoffman

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Vagabond Quest

Dina and Ryan hit the road back in 2009 and have never stopped since. They’ve been very “slowmad” in their approach which has allowed them to dive deeper into countries and cultures and provided richer experiences than some of the nomad couples traveling at a fast pace will have seen.

Ordinary Traveler

Woodrow and Scott Calafiore are anything but ordinary travellers. They’ve been on the digital nomad trail for nearly a decade now and their blog is one of the most influential nomad and travel blogs out there. They’re particularly well-known for their innovative approach to photography. They also have a software company.

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Midlife Road Trip

Proving that you don’t have to be twenty to see the world and run your own business, Rick Griffin and Sandi McKenna are the middle aged pair who keep on trekking. Rick decided to strike out on the travel trip of a lifetime when he nearly died back in 2004 and he persuaded Sandi to join him. They now run a radio show and are famous for working with some of the biggest brands in the world.

Never Ending Voyage

Simon Fairbairn and Erin McNeaney, a digital nomad couple who sold everything to travel the world indefinitely.

Both travelled in 2008 for a year and soon returned home to the UK. However they found it difficult to get back into everyday life involving routine and repetitiveness. Having experienced the vastness of the world and all of the opportunity out there, they struggled to fit back into business as usual.

So they headed off again, but this time we left for good. Sold everything they owned, quit their jobs, rented out their house and headed out to play dice with destiny. 

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Hecktic Travels

Dalene and Peter Heck are the husband wife team who make up Hecktic Travels. Their blog is one of the most professionally produced nomad blogs that we’ve ever seen. They jumped out of corporate life in 2007 and started living in “200 litres of backpack space” and haven’t looked back. They say, “We have no plans to slow down. This life is too good.”

Flying the Nest

This Australian couple, Stephen and Jess, are relatively new to digital nomad life and only started out in 2014 but that hasn’t stopped them from gaining a lot of favourable intention. Other nomads may travel sedately but they’re trying to pack in years of living wherever they go, even if they’re only there for a few days. We really liked their YouTube channel.

 

Different Doors

If you think it’s depressing that all digital nomad blogs seem to come from a certain type of Westerner, then you’ll love the change presented by the couple who run Different Doors. They, Revati and Charles Victor, are an Indian professional couple hailing from Mumbai. They want to talk about unique experiences rather than standard travel tales and we think they do an amazing job of it.

A Cruising Couple

Dan and Casey say they’re “lovebirds, world travellers, and adventurers extraordinaire.” They see it as their mission to make adventurous travel more accessible to everyone. They take an unusual vantage point from their blog to achieve this. They look at both the luxury and ultra-budget experiences each place they visit has to offer and then provide commentary on what works best.

A Brit and A Southerner

This is a fantastic blog from an American and British couple that have been tearing up the trail and seeing vast swathes of the world and running their own business. We really like the fact that they’ve integrated both their professional lives and their nomadic lifestyles in a single blog format rather than trying to keep the two separate.

There’s a lot you could learn from Chris and Heather Boothman.

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Conclusion

As you can see it can be easy for digital nomad couples to thrive together. If you’re going to become a digital nomad couple and you think you might be passing through Croatia, don’t forget to contact us to arrange your accommodation and we will find the best place for you to stay.

15 Hidden Gems in Croatia

Here at GoGo Places we like to think that we know a little bit about Croatia as it’s the country we are opening up first to visitors around the world. That puts us in the right place not just to talk about the quality of life, the beautiful beaches and the incredible people of this European nation but also about the amazing places that most visitors never see.

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We’d like to share our 15 favourite hidden gems in Croatia and we hope that you’ll join us soon to appreciate them in person.

Stiniva Bay

You can only get to Stiniva Bay by boat and it’s really worth your effort to do so.  There is splendid beachfront isolation combined with clear waters and dramatic rock cliffs. It’s the sort of paradise on earth that you never forget.

Pupnatska Beach

This is the perfect place to get your diving gear on and check out the local marine life. The water is always relatively still and utterly transparent, and did we mention that the location is also absolutely stunning? You need to see it, to believe it.

Lastovo island

Croatia’s second most distant island, Lastovo, remains at the edge of the world. Beyond Ubli, where car ferries dock daily from Split (five hours, via Korcula), modernity seems a rumour. Wifi? Even the phone signal is sketchy. Yet Lastovo is more than an island to remember how to relax.

Washed by the cleanest seas in the Mediterranean, it offers good diving (find out more at www.lastovo-diving-ankora.com) and walks on a wild island wholly designated a nature park.

Gdinj, Hvar Island

Gidinj is a lovely village near Hvar in Croatia. Hvar is the capital of the island which bears its name. The area is highly picturesque and has more than a century of experience of dealing with visitors looking to get away from it all. The beaches are very attractive and rarely busy.

Hvar; CroatiaReference: http://www.goholidaylets.com/Croatia/1556

Dugi Otok (Croatia’s Long Island)

Dugi Otok is the seventh largest island in the Adriatic and the right place to get away for a relaxing break. You’re also on the doorstep of the Kornati Islands National Park from here. You will find some great hiking in the neighbourhood when you want to get away from the beach.

Sakarun Beach

You’ll need to hurry because Sakuran Beach is starting to leak out into the mainstream radar and when it does – it will no longer be the best place to take a family for a weekend’s swimming and sandcastle building, but until then, it is.

Lovrecina

There are very few sights in life as breath-taking as the first glimpse that you get of Lovrečina. It’s a jaw dropping spectacle that near demands that you go and pay your respects by lounging on the beach and swimming in the still blue waters.

LovecinaReference: http://www.beach-backgrounds.com/the-wallpaper-of-beautiful-lovrecina-beach-in-croatia

Bobovista

Bobovista is a sleepy town which promises and delivers a safe haven away from home. The local restaurants are famed for their fresh catch and nothing beats walking hand in hand along the harbour front on a romantic evening.

Postira

Please keep this one under the radar; it’s too peaceful to benefit from huge crowds of visitors but it can be our perfect secret. Postira was made for chilling out in. You may find that the only downside of visiting Postira is that it’s very hard to move on when your time there runs out, it’s just too nice.

Badija Island 

This island is home to a monastery but don’t let that put you off lying on the beach and soaking up the sun. It’s a fantastic getaway destination and the monks won’t mind you enjoying the island as much as they do.

Galesnjak

The “island of love” is one of the most romantic spots in Croatia and while there are beautiful beaches there’s also plenty of wild, untamed nature to be found here.

Vrulje

You may not associate Croatia with desert islands but strangely Vrulje is pretty close to it. It’s an incredible place in the Kornati Islands which captures every travellers’ heart.

VruljeReference: http://www.vrulje-kornati.com/vruljeDE.html

Komiza Town

Komiza is well-known and well-loved for its wine making prowess and this sleeping fishing town has far more to it than meets the eye. We recommend that you check out the Blue Grotto and try some of the local honey for which the area is also famous.

Pomena Beach

Don’t tell anyone about Pomena Beach, it’s our favourite unspoiled spot in Croatia. Check it out and you’ll find crystal blue seas surrounded by the green of nature. It’s not to be missed.

Zaklopatica Bay

It’s great to get up high above the bay and see this wonderful natural inlet from the sea and its shore front. There are almost no crowds to be found in this area and you can enjoy a superbly peaceful time in Zkalopatica Bay.

ZakloptaicaReference: http://www.lastovotravel.com/zaklopatica/

That should give you some food for thought as to where to visit in Croatia. If you’d like to learn more about this beautiful country and to stay at GoGo Places, sign up to our newsletter today. Or check out a previous blog about how Croatia is becoming the new digital nomad hangout.

Top 10 European Travel Photographers we Follow at GoGo Places

Travelling the world and taking photos is easy. Travelling the world and taking photos that make people sit up and pay attention? That’s hard. And it’s getting harder too.

Photography used to be a profession that was challenging to get into because of the costs of equipment, and now with Instagram on your phone everyone is a photographer. So, to stand out from the background noise is twice as difficult as it once was.

These 10 European Travel Photographers have somehow managed to do just that:

Jonas Bendiksen

Jonas is one of Norway’s finest photographers and something of a household name in photography. His series of photographs shot in Kenya’s capital city, Nairobi, called Kiera was awarded a National Magazine Award in 2007. His ability to set the scene and make a photo tell a story is unrivalled and that’s why National Geographic and Newsweek number among his clients.

Matthias Derhake

Preaching responsible tourism Matthias is a German with an eye for the unusual and is carving out a name for himself on social media as he does so. His blog is interesting though you may need Google translate if you want to pick up all the nuances of the text within.

Tom

This Dutch photographer, known to the world as TravelTomTom is one of the most popular photographers on Instagram. He’s done things you wouldn’t believe in order to get the perfect shots and has taken over 100 flights to see multiple countries and continents.

Travelling Weasels

You get two for the price of one with the Travelling Weasels. Laura is from the United Kingdom and Tanbay is German and they’ve been on the road for a long time taking photos and seeing the world and all it has to offer.

Johnny Ward

Johnny, an Irish photographer, recently managed to complete a full tour of the world. That is he’s set foot in every single country on earth. His images from Yemen (his 2nd last country) are truly incredible and the photos from Norway (where he celebrates the end of the trip) are coming very soon.

Will Hatton – The Broke Backpacker

One of the first and best known digital nomad photographers, Will Hatton tells inspiring stories of his life on the road with no money and just a camera for company. With over 50,000 Instagram followers, he’s definitely doing something right.

Claudio Giovenzana

Claudio is an unusual photographer best known for his travel work which includes his teddy bear. He also makes most of his living from Shutterstock work which is very different from most professionals who try to earn their crust from selling directly to magazines or clients. It does mean, however, that Claudio’s work has been widely viewed because of the ease of accessibility of his shots for commercial use.

Silvia Lawrence

Silvia is both European and American as she holds passports from both Norway and the USA. However, she’s stopped travelling and chosen to make herself based in Norway for now and that tilts the scales to full European. She’s photographed over 70 countries and her travel stuff is widely followed.

Marie Hennechart

Marie is a French photographer who’s been taking travel photos for more than twenty years. Her portfolio includes work published in Travel & Leisure, Conde Nast Traveler, and the Wall Street Journal to name but a few. She’s based out of Montmartre in Paris but from the looks of her website, she rarely stays still long enough to appreciate it.

Davide Petilli

Last but very definitely not least on our list is Davide Petilli from Italy. He’s been travelling the world for years now in search of the perfect travel shots and his sense of whimsy and individuality really sets him apart from many other photographers. His use of black and white is very strong but it’s the colour shots that show just how much creativity Davide can bring to bear on his work.

Summary

These 10 photographers are all brilliant in their own way. It will be interesting to see what the coming years have in store for photography – as the competition to create incredible images becomes ever more intense.

If you’re a digital nomad, whether it be in Europe or elsewhere, you have to start recording your memories and hopefully these photographers will inspire you to take better snaps yourself.

Find us on Facebook, share you best piece of photography and we will give you a shout out.

Also, don’t forget to sign up to our mailing list and be the first to know when we update our property listings or upload a new blog post.

10 Undervalued Up and Coming Digital Nomad Locations for 2017

Digital nomadism is here to stay but where should an aspiring or established nomad go to get the best bang for their buck and still keep things interesting? Chiang Mai and Ubud are over and that’s a good thing – there’s a whole wide world to see before you hang up your laptop.

5 Digital Nomad Locations in Asia

Half of the list goes to Asian destinations and that’s because they’re often the least expensive. It’s worth noting that this may come at the compromise of quality of life compared to many other places.

Udon Thani, Thailand

What’s so great about Chiang Mai, anyway? Thailand’s not some backwater dump; it’s a big modern country. Udon Thani has a ton of advantages over Chiang Mai:

It’s closer to Laos so border runs for visas are easier;

The accommodation costs are much lower and you can get a swish pad in the city centre for half the price of a condo on Nimman;

It has a ton of great nightlife and it’s on the doorstep of one of Thailand’s UNESCO world heritage sites.

Udan Thani

Battambang, Cambodia

Cambodia has surprisingly good internet even if it is a little bit pricier than the rest of the region. Battambang, however, is the perfect place for nomads who need to get work done:

It’s the cheapest city in Cambodia for rents;

The city itself has some of the finest French colonial architecture in Asia;

Beer, food and transport are among the lowest cost in the world;

Visas and work permits are insanely easy to obtain and renew.

Mandalay, Myanmar

Those looking for perfect, always on and high speed internet shouldn’t consider Mandalay for a few years yet. Those with a little more freedom to choose, however, should consider:

The city has much lower rental costs than in Yangon;

It’s in the heart of some of the most unspoiled territory in Asia;

Myanmar has only recently opened up and you’ll be among the first long-term visitors to Mandalay which means getting the “real vibe” before it’s overrun by tourists.

Kochi, Kerala, India

Goa is so last year and it’s lost much of its appeal as both a tourist and digital nomad destination. Kochi in Kerala is the rising star to take its place:

Still very much untouched by nomads but a major city all the same with all the amenities that brings;

Not far from the beach and the province itself offers a ton of temples, mountains and other places of interest to explore;

It’s always warm without ever getting to the point of unbearably hot.

Zhuhai, China

Zhuhai is an up and coming city on China’s Southern Coast. It offers easy access to the comforts of Macau without the prices of Macau:

Fantastic internet availability and a wealth of cheap places to work from;

A chance to see the Chinese boom take place around you;

A vibrant expat community to make up for the lack of nomads there at the moment.

5 Digital Nomad Locations in the Rest of the World

It’s fair to say these are likely to be a little more expensive than the Asian destinations but, at the same time, they do offer a higher overall quality of life.

Katerini, Greece

Greece is more expensive than you might think but Katerini bucks the trend and has the lowest cost of living of any town in the country and there’s a lot to be said for the place:

It’s only 6 km from the beach and there are a lot of beaches to choose from;

It’s surrounded by places of historical interest such as the ancient city of Dion;

There are great transport links to the rest of Greece;

Thessaloniki nearby is a UNESCO world heritage site.

Slavonski Brod, Croatia

The name doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue but this small student city is low cost and surprisingly good value too:

Pleasant year round temperature and an easily walkable city;

Weekends are when the students come out to party and the weeks are pleasantly relaxed;

There’s a ton of cafes, clubs, shops and galleries and the internet is great too (check out our previous blog regarding co-working spaces).

When visiting Croatia your first point of call should be GoGo Places. Check out our list of homes – all affordable and competitive prices too.

Santa Marta, Colombia

It’s Medellin that’s getting all the attention at the moment but Santa Marta is cheaper and it’s got great beach access. Internet may be a bit patchy though:

Some of the best scuba diving in South America and the jet skiing is good too;

Get in touch with the life (and death) of Simon Bolivar one of the most significant figures in South American history;

It’s a  great place to learn Spanish cheaply and the bars and restaurants are great.

Lipari Island (one of the Aeolian Islands off the coast of Sicily)

Lipari is the largest, busiest and most accessible of the Aeolian Islands. Visitors arriving from the mainland will likely experience it as a relaxing introduction to island life.

The town is so quaint and picturesque – even the tiny little cobblestone streets leading directly to the sea looks like it was plucked directly out of a children’s storybook.

A busy little port with a pretty, pastel-coloured seafront and plenty of accommodation, it makes the most convenient base for island hopping.

It is cheap and cheerful;

Easy public transport options available

Cape Town, South Africa

Cape Town remains Southern Africa’s most popular destination and for good reason. It’s low cost and the only place in Africa with reliable and high speed Internet:

Good and cheap transport (which you will need as Cape Town is a big city);

Museums, botanical gardens, beach access, and nearby safaris;

Great nightlife, co-working spaces and endless things to do.

Summary

If you want to get off the beaten path and hit up a nomad destination which offers great value for money and a wealth of things to see and do, why not check out one of these 10 locations?

They make a pleasant change from the clichés of Chiang Mai, Prague, Ubud, etc. and will give you a chance to develop your identity as a digital nomad without breaking the bank.

Don’t forget to stay tuned with the latest news at GoGo Places, sign up to our newsletter and you will be the first to read our blogs and grab the latest deals with our homes.

7 Must Read Books for Every Digital Nomad

With the disruption of the workforce continuing unabated, many are now beginning to realise that old career paths aren’t as stable as they used to be.

At the same time, some have also heard about the rise of the digital nomad, who are professionals that use worldwide internet connectivity to complete work or run a business from anywhere on the planet.

Seeing pictures of them getting it done at beach bars on the other side of the world is enough to make others want to join their ranks.

If you wish to achieve this goal as well, reading well-written books will go a long way towards providing you with the knowledge needed to become a digital nomad.

Below, we will highlight seven books that will equip aspiring location independent professionals with the information that they will need in order to build a business or recruit a client base that will allow them to operate from anywhere in the world.

The Four-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss

Although you could set out on your digital nomad journey without reading The Four Hour Work Week, you would be missing out on learning about the path that one of the pioneers of the movement blazed on his way to becoming location independent.

From the opening chapters, Tim Ferriss makes the case that retirement is an antiquated notion at best and that it would be best to focus our efforts on creating a lifestyle that allows us to use our time any way we see fit.

As you progress through the book, he lays out the groundwork for freedom-minded individuals to find their own way to location independence, all while peppering in success stories that will make you ask, “If these people made it happen, what’s my excuse?”

Vagabonding by Rolf Potts

Like the idea of a life of perpetual travel, but think that it is out of reach for you? Rolf Potts will shatter your perception of it being a fundamentally expensive endeavour by laying out how even those of meagre means can make it happen.

An efficient read at only 240 pages, Vagabonding delivers massive value by showing you how one can finance their travels with relative ease, adjust to life in a foreign country, deal with common frustrations, and cope with reverse culture shock upon returning home.

By reading this book, not only will you be convinced that this life is possible, but you will be better prepared for the realities of coping with cultural norms that differ from your own.

Crush It! by Gary Vaynerchuk

Even if you plan on entering the digital workforce as a freelancer or remote worker, there are a number of tasks that you will now have to perform that was handled by your former company.

In essence, you are now your own business, so you need to act like an entrepreneur, even if you don’t consider yourself to be one.

While it only covers basic technical issues of working for yourself, Gary Vaynerchuk’s Crush It! acts mostly as a metaphorical kick in the butt for those needing a spark to get up off their duff and seek out opportunities that will ensure a long and fruitful career away from the 9-5 paradigm.

The Personal MBA by Josh Kaufman

Unlike Crush It!, The Personal MBA by Josh Kaufman does get into the nuts and bolts of being in business for yourself.

Aiming to be a DIY substitute for those that are unwilling to shell out many thousands of dollars for a traditional MBA, it breaks down the basics of sales, marketing, negotiation, productivity, operations, and so on.

It also addresses issues that haven’t been adequately covered by staid academic programs that have changed little since the mid-20th century, which also makes it a valuable book for those that already have a business degree.

All things considered, this book is a must-read for all digital nomads.

Delivering Happiness by Tony Hsieh

Despite having time and mobility freedom, you’ll still need to please your remote employer, clients, or customers if you have any hope of sustaining this lifestyle in the long run.

To do this, you will need to internalise a philosophy of creating delight for everyone that you work with; in our opinion, reading Tony Hsieh’s Delivering Happiness is the quickest way to internalise these principles.

As the CEO of Zappos (which was acquired by Amazon in 2009), Tony applied lessons learned from the science behind happiness to improve relations with clients and employees.

As such, this read will also be valuable if you end up hiring outsourcers/employees, making it a great book to keep in your rucksack/suitcase as you travel the world and grow your location independent business.

The Art of Non-Conformity by Chris Guillebeau

Written by serial entrepreneur Chris Guillebeau, The Art of Non-Conformity is a guide that implores you to challenge the assumptions that society has laid out before you, and to life a live that fits you rather than shoehorning yourself into someone else’s mould.

Based on the example that Chris has set over two decades of self-employment, you can travel to every country in the world, volunteer to help make it a better place, work on that passion project, or whatever else tickles your fancy. You are the writer of your own play – not someone else.

Remote by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson

This book, by 37signals, shows both employers and employees how they can work together, remotely, from any desk, in any space, in any place, anytime and anywhere in the world.

With 326 reviews averaging a 4-star rating and with high ranking on Amazon, proves this book is selling in the ten of thousands monthly. It can be downloaded as an e-book, purchased as a hard copy of audio file.

It explores the “working from home” model very clearly and will certainly give you food for thought, if you are thinking of becoming a digital nomad and is a must read.

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